What does preventive care prevent?

Getting preventive care reduces the risk of illness, disability, and death, but millions of people in the United States don't receive recommended preventive health care services. Healthy People 2030 focuses on increasing preventive care for people of all ages.

What does preventive care prevent?

Getting preventive care reduces the risk of illness, disability, and death, but millions of people in the United States don't receive recommended preventive health care services. Healthy People 2030 focuses on increasing preventive care for people of all ages. Preventive care is what you do (before you get sick) to stay healthy. So why should you go to the doctor when you're healthy? The simple answer is that preventive care can help you stay healthier and, as a result, lower your healthcare costs.

Preventive health care can save your life. Routine medical care that includes exams, checkups, and patient counseling to prevent illness, illness, or other health problems. The obesity epidemic increases the influence of disease prevention due to its prominent role as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other important factors contributing to mortality and costs. Ideally, your primary care provider should perform preventive screenings, have your health history, monitor any chronic illnesses and medications, perform tests, and bring in a specialist when the need arises.

However, if additional follow-up care is needed, such as another procedure to remove additional growths or any treatment if cancer is detected, it is not considered preventive, so you may have to pay some out-of-pocket costs. When considering strategies to control rising health care costs, the projected increase in the prevalence of chronic diseases is both a matter of concern and an opportunity for intervention. However, preventive care can also help identify health problems such as high blood pressure, diabetes, or certain types of cancer sooner, when they are most treatable. Woolf concludes his presentation by stating that slowing growth in healthcare spending will ultimately require redistributing current spending to high-value services such as prevention.

Flottemesch concludes that, while different types of evidence-based clinical preventive services have the potential to have differential impacts based on current delivery rates and target populations, evidence-based preventive services should be adopted and their use should be encouraged, due to their impact positive in health. Overall, they have found lower costs with specialized palliative care teams, as well as greater patient satisfaction. That's not to say that evidence-based preventive services, such as those considered here, should not be promoted. Investing in such effective, high-value preventive services is one element of a major transformation toward value-based priorities in health spending.

In addition, there are certainly questionable preventive services for which there is not yet a good evidence base.

Mamie Blatti
Mamie Blatti

Extreme food lover. Professional music aficionado. Amateur pop culture practitioner. Incurable writer. Award-winning beer specialist. Amateur coffee geek.